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Drought Relief

I have a challenge for each and every person that reads this post – including all South African bloggers.

As a farmer you are responsible for your family, your workers and the livestock. You know your workers’ mother/father/child/brother/sister/cousin and you work side by side in the fields, with the livestock. Both you and your workers know the animals by name, you raise them, they are real living beings to you.

Imagine you are a farmer in the drought-stricken Cape region right now

The drought has wiped out your bank account. You have no income. You start cutting costs. Eventually you have to let go of a worker that has been next to you for years. You know that you are taking away this person’s livelihood and that they won’t be able to support their family. It breaks your heart.

Then there is nothing left. You can’t buy feed for your livestock. They wither away in front of your eyes, they slowly and painfully starve. You have to look your hungry animals in the eye while being merciful to the dying animal in front of you. They die in droves. It breaks your heart. It breaks your soul.

You’re not even sure how you are going to feed your own family. You don’t even have money to keep the kids in school. The kids won’t be getting a Christmas present. It just breaks you completely.

Imagine if you could do something…

I have been crying like a crazy person while watching the footage on the Droogtehulp met Burre Burger Facebook page. Keep in mind that I don’t know these people but I can relate, because I grew up on a farm.

I first donated a little bit of money, but it has kept me awake at night thinking of the situation my fellow South Africans are in. Right now there are people that have lost everything – this includes the farmers, farmworkers (and families) and the surrounding communities – and obviously all the cattle, sheep, farm dogs, cats…

There was one particular story that was so heart-breaking that I could not sleep last night. The farmers were tasked with checking up on their neighbours and one lady came back with this… They thought the neighbouring farm was abandoned, dead and dying animals everywhere, no movement. Then however they spotted movement in the caravan where the farmer had moved into. He had nothing. He was broken. A later clip showed two big farmers delivering some food and necessities, they were overcome with emotion. They pointed out that there was a dying lamb under the caravan. They were there to help, but yet they were also too late… There wasn’t a clip on the farmer discovering the goods – and I’m still thinking about that.

So what can you do?

Can you (or someone you know) spare R10, R100 or R1000? Go to www.droogtehulp.co.za/en and get the banking details to deposit what you can spare. Now turn to your friend, your brother, your colleague and challenge them to match your donation.

If you are a blogger – please create a post on this very important cause, share this post on your Facebook, Twitter… Inspire others, donate.

Where to find the information

Droogtehulp Burre Burger

9 thoughts on “Drought Relief

  1. I live in the Free State, and the farmers in this area were crying just like this last year and the year before. It is scandalous how little media coverage they get. I believe that they would have a lot more support if people just knew about the struggles they face. Not just drought but violence and blatant sabotage is all part of their daily life in trying to provide food for this nation. Great post. I will most certainly share!!! Thank you.
    #lekkerlinky

  2. We can so easily forget about the farmers; I am guilty of that; I focus on the water me and my family needs and what we can do to save. Thank you for making us aware of the greater tragedy this drought is causing #lekkerlinky

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